Author Topic: Fishing in the rocks  (Read 395 times)

Online CrappieCat

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Fishing in the rocks
« on: 07/26/17 08:33 UTC »
For Crappies ,
Cast and retrieve method,
What is your preferred jig head style
that you use for less hang ups ?
Is one better than good old round head.

Online ctom

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Re: Fishing in the rocks
« Reply #1 on: 07/26/17 08:51 UTC »
I pretty much use just collarless ballheads for all of my crappie fishing and that includes rocks. The one exception is that I'll use a collarless ballhead mold and cast a #6 wacky hook into it at 1/32 ounce and a size 2 wacky hook for larger heads up to about 3/16 for fishing rip rap and wing dams or even sunken rock piles. The more forward eye of the hook allows this jig to swim way more natural and also allows me to crawl the rig over and around rocks without getting hung too often and then its more from the head itself falling into a crevice and not the hook.

Rocks are one of those structures that a guy has to plan on losing a few heads in if he is going to fish rock successfully. In some instances a slip or fixed float will let you fish over rock  without issue but if the wind/waves come up that float won't prevent hang-ups unless its set way above the rock. What I have found on crappies [and sunfish] relating to rocks is that they will suspend over them or in the cast of rip-rip along side of them and the closer the fish are to the rock the more active they tend to be. On rip-rap I find the most active fish are usually where the rock and the mud bottom meet but rip-rap crappies can be active anywhere in the water column along the structure.

Online Muskygary

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Re: Fishing in the rocks
« Reply #2 on: 07/26/17 13:06 UTC »
In Indiana we don't have much rock. Most of our lakes are marl or sandy. You find the crappies scattered along the weed line. My favorite jig is the aspirin  head in 1/16 or 1/8. I usually put a eye on it so I don't have to bother with eyes on my plastics. (Usually fish it under a bobber)