Author Topic: Differences in tubes and how they fish  (Read 1104 times)

Online WALLEYE WACKER

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Re: Differences in tubes and how they fish
« Reply #15 on: 07/18/18 22:43 UTC »
Nice mold Tom them toothy one’s tear things up.

Offline smalljaw

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Re: Differences in tubes and how they fish
« Reply #16 on: 07/19/18 07:43 UTC »
  I just read this and I disagree. Respectfully. It's why I fish a 5/8 oz jig instead of a 1/4 oz one. It doesn't fall any faster. Gravity pulls at the same speed no matter the weight. The bigger tube will displace more water and slow it down some but same size tube different weight will all fall the same speed. Why I fish the 5/8 oz is because it's heavier and easier to control in the wind. Fall rate to the bottom is the same if I make it the same profile.
  Oh and I don't use salt in my tubes either. If I'm using a weight then what is the salt going to help me with ? It only weakens the plastic.

The way you are fishing a Tube is much different than I do, and with all due respect, in my waters you'd struggle to get bit. The water I fish is clear and the smallmouth are pressured, they see a lot of tubes so the lighter the weight the better, anything over 1/4oz and forget it. A tube rigged on a 1/4oz head will have a wider spiral on the fall than a 5/8oz head, and it is really noticeable as we see it just going up to a 3/8oz head. It is different if you are Texas rigging a bait and throwing it dirty water or fishing it in 30' of water, but then the look of the bait isn't as critical. A tube with no salt will need more weight to keep it down when fishing in current, I have tried the no salt approach looking for a bait with a little more buoyancy and it didn't pan out so well, again I'm fishing in water 12' and under, weight is extremely critical and when fishing with current and wind a tiny difference in weight can really make a difference. Last year I had a day in which me and my buddy were fishing a small rock hump in the middle of the river in 5' of water, both of use were using the same tubes, I had a 3/32oz head and he was using a 1/8oz head, I had 9 fish landed before he finally switched to the 3/32oz head and then he began catching fish, but again, this is where there is a lot of pressure and presentation have to be fine tuned and a 5/8oz weight isn't even in any boats when it comes to tubes. For largemouth I will often T-rig a 4" tube with a 1/2oz weight and pitch it to boat docks with brush piles and dead falls, it is a reaction strike and so it is about speed more than action but smallmouth don't play that game. I do understand what you are saying but the waters I fish you have to really make minute changes in color, rigging, and weights, a 1/32oz difference in jig head size can be the difference between a banner day and getting skunked and while salt does weaken the plastic, you won't get bit here without it.

Offline Porkrind

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Re: Differences in tubes and how they fish
« Reply #17 on: 07/21/18 23:31 UTC »
I brought this topic up mainly because tubes are one of my favorite go to baits when I lose my confidence but I’ve never thought into them to much. That being said I’ve asked about the Tango Tube mold a few times on here and only received minimal feedback on it. My next purchase WILL have something to do with tubes whether it’s the dipping rods or molds. I may just buy both. I really like the idea of a ribbed tube as I think it will glide down and present itself differently. If no one has that much experience with the Tango tube I’d at least like to get some opinions on ribbed vs smooth tubes. Some pros & cons if you will. Thanks again to everyone and Smalljaw especially for this thread as it has more insight into tubes than anything I’ve seen. Heck I could read an entire book about tubes if there is one lol.

Online ctom

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Re: Differences in tubes and how they fish
« Reply #18 on: 07/22/18 01:28 UTC »
The tango is a very popular tube bait and the beauty lies in not only the ribbed body but also in your ability to switch the spline type from the regular 18 strand to the spiked 15 strand to the 6 strand wiggle strand. You'll need to buy the extra splines but they are well worth the money. Each tail type affects the drop and action of the tube accordingly without having to buy the mold body for each.

As for any merits between a smooth and a ribbed tube body, and this is just me, but I prefer the ribbed. Occasionally I'll add some scent and the ribbing helps keep the scent on the tube longer. As mentioned the ribs will also catch air and slightly slow the drop rate. More important I feel that the ribbing offers some texture to the tube that fish seem to hold onto better and longer.

I use the Tango with the standard spline for Lake Trout and for river Walleyes when the water temps are slightly above freezing and do well on both, but on occasion I hit rivers for smallies and do well with the tango. This is a tube that's very easy to work with and honestly is very hard to improve upon.