Author Topic: test  (Read 809 times)

Online ctom

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test
« on: 04/25/18 10:01 UTC »
test

Thought I'd better do a test since I lost all my photos due to a wonderful screw-up by google. I cooked up this black and charteruse frog this morning then did the brush number with shifting pearls. The top color shifts from blue to purple and every color imaginable in between those two color. The bottom is hard to see but is a gold that shifts to green to a pink as the bait is turned in light. The side-view picture shows some of the bottom color where they meet.

Online WALLEYE WACKER

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Re: test
« Reply #1 on: 04/25/18 10:33 UTC »
Very cool color Tom

Online ctom

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Re: test
« Reply #2 on: 04/25/18 11:06 UTC »
Here's another toad done with different color shifting pigments. This one has a belly color that shows mostly as a nice yellow-gold in good light but gets right into green and blue and purple as the light angle and intensity changes. The back is a wild color that in the picture shows as a charcoal- heavy green color that shifts into a fiery hot-copper, red glitter color in lower and less direct light levels. If the sun were behind clouds for the picture of this one the other colors would be jumping out all over. Its a dandy as it sits though so no complaints.

Online ctom

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Re: test
« Reply #3 on: 04/25/18 11:08 UTC »
Here's another toad done with different color shifting pigments. This one has a belly color that shows mostly as a nice yellow-gold in good light but gets right into green and blue and purple as the light angle and intensity changes. The green is coming out where the back and belly meet. The back is a wild color that in the picture shows as a charcoal- heavy green color that shifts into a fiery hot-copper, red glitter color in lower and less direct light levels. If the sun were behind clouds for the picture of this one the other colors would be jumping out all over. Its a dandy as it sits though so no complaints.

Online WALLEYE WACKER

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Re: test
« Reply #4 on: 04/25/18 18:18 UTC »
That’s nice to Tom.

Online ctom

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Re: test
« Reply #5 on: 04/25/18 18:21 UTC »
The picture doesn't do much for the second bait. In the hand its a hot rod though. A guy just picked up some baits and he was all over the frog. He wanted it badly but no sale.

Online Paneltruck.lures

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Re: test
« Reply #6 on: 04/25/18 20:34 UTC »
That looks awesome Tom, great work as usual
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Online brandx112679

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Re: test
« Reply #7 on: 04/25/18 20:50 UTC »

 Ctom, on one of my post, you wrote why go to the trouble, the fish can't tell the difference, when I was painting my stone molds. My question is this, the different shifting colors why go to the trouble? I agree they look cool, but will it catch more fish?

Online ctom

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Re: test
« Reply #8 on: 04/25/18 21:43 UTC »
Its something different, not found in stores. Every bait is unique. And I like creating baits that nobody else has, pure and simple. If I remember right you wanted a shiny bait and was painting or wanted to paint a stone mold to achieve this. The difference between a bait that has a slick finish or a matte one is that in the water the fish won't see a difference between the two from in the water.....they're both wet. That was the root of my comment. This surface pearling is color play, something that fish can actually see a difference or change in and is entirely different from what you were doing.

I have several stone molds for ring-bodied crappie paddletails that make baits with a matte finish as well as several cnc molds that make very productive, shiny surfaced baits. On any given day these dull baits typically out-fish baits with a shiny finish. Is it the finish? On that merit alone I don't think so, but I do know that when using any combination of the shiny or matte baits, changing colors can be a huge difference in catch or not catching fish and that the shiny or matte is a very moot issue. I pay close attention to color in my fishing, but that's just me. But its also why I try so many different schemes using a lot of the color shifting products. The color shifting pearls and surface brushing them to achieve what I get is fairly new to me [within the last year] so I can't honestly say that going to the trouble gets me any more fish. I do know from personal use that they do, in fact, catch fish.

If you feel that you'll gain something by painting the stone mold, have at it and let us know how it turns out. Something I would do before spraying an actual cavity though is to  clean the stone on the outside of the mold well, make sure its totally dry and give the mold a shot of the paint you want to use and let it harden up for a couple days then try peeling the paint off using a sharp point of a small knife. If the paint holds, pour a little hot plastic on it and let the plastic cool, then lift it off to see if the paint holds tight. If it holds tight you're good to go. All of my stone molds have very fine ribbing on the bait's bodies. Painting the molds would more than likely diminish the space between the ribs and likely negatively affect injecting. If your molds are ribbed in a similar fashion I'd be very cautious of painting them.

Online brandx112679

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Re: test
« Reply #9 on: 04/26/18 09:39 UTC »


 I no that when wet, a bait will likely not show much difference. The point I wanted to make is, that I was wanting to get the baits looking  a little glossier because the people that use these baits wanted them that way.
Every one has a right to there opinion. And mine is, that the color shifting is just mostly to look cool, to the fisherman and the fish most likely it won't make a difference.
 I can't prove that, and neither can you.
I have had success with painting these molds, and have also had success with painting the ribbed molds, paddletails and others.
I'm sure that you have many people that like to see the difference, in the different pearls, and that's fine, but I don't think that there's anything wrong with other people trying to improve on there molds, with their ideas either.


Online ctom

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Re: test
« Reply #10 on: 04/26/18 13:12 UTC »
Have at it, bud. The sky's the limit on tackle crafting.

Online Shaunm81

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Re: test
« Reply #11 on: 04/26/18 17:17 UTC »
Wow! That is awesome work there Tom

Offline Lamar

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Re: test
« Reply #12 on: 04/26/18 18:39 UTC »
Nice work Tom. I like that the legs show up well. I'm old and can't see camo frogs well any more.

Online ctom

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Re: test
« Reply #13 on: 04/26/18 20:34 UTC »
I like that the legs show up well. I'm old and can't see camo frogs well any more.

On frogs and toads I am fully convinced that if the legs work and can be seen, the bass will hit. Chartreuse just helps in the bright color department. Last year I did some black bodies with fire red legs and the northerns really liked them. I mean a whole lot they liked them. Those devil northerns cost me the three red legged frogs rigged on expensive wide gaps. The Mississippi backwaters pike seem only so-so interested in chartreuse so its a great color for bass to zero in on. lol

Online basscatlildave

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Re: test
« Reply #14 on: 04/28/18 10:31 UTC »
Great work.