Author Topic: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families  (Read 375 times)

Offline Lines

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Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« on: 05/26/18 19:05 UTC »

Thank you for protecting us all. God Bless You & your Families.
« Last Edit: 05/26/18 19:07 UTC by Lines »


Offline Paneltruck.lures

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #2 on: 05/26/18 21:24 UTC »
Yes thank you so much!
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Online WALLEYE WACKER

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #3 on: 05/26/18 22:48 UTC »
Thanks to those that serve so we have the freedoms we have and remember are fallen brother’s , sister’s and there families.

Offline Lines

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #4 on: 05/27/18 07:27 UTC »
Yes, especially the fallen and thier families who paid the ultimate price for us.

 "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends." (John 15:13)
« Last Edit: 05/27/18 07:32 UTC by Lines »

Offline Shaunm81

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #5 on: 05/27/18 15:52 UTC »
Yes thanks for everything

Offline Denny Welch

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #6 on: 05/27/18 16:56 UTC »
It was the late 60's, Vietnam was in full force, flags were being burned, young bodies were being shipped home daily draped by those same flags , soldiers and sailors and airmen were being spit upon, Free Speech took on a whole new meaning and our nation was split down the middle.  I had a college deferment, but my grades weren't the best so I enlisted in the Army.  During basic training I applied for, and was accepted into, the Officer Candidate School.  Upon completion of basic I was assigned to. Artillery OCS, located at Fort Sill, OK. 

I spent the next six months learning how to lead other young men into battle. (I was 20 years old at the time).  There were no false illusions...we all knew that our next assignment would be in Vietnam.  We kept tabs on body counts and battles.  We all got letters from home informing us of friends who "didn't make it".  We all had an outward false sense of bravado, but inside we were scared "s...less". 

Those six months went by way too fast.  Graduation was upon us and our new duty station would be announced at the ceremony.  It started with awards.  (I got the Outstanding Candidate Award, aka the Biggest Suck-Up Award).  The ceremony ended with the announcement of duty stations.  Of the 80 or so graduates, all but 6 went to Vietnam and I was one of them.  I was assigned to an 8" Self-propelled Howitzer battalion in Nurnberg, West Germany.

I spent the next two years learning how to drink beer and how to eat schnitzel.  I wore a clean uniform every day, had regular mail delivery, drove an Alpha Romero, vacationed in London and Switzerland and Austria.  I got a European discharge and a buddy and I spent over 4 months on motorcycles touring Western Europe.  I lived in a cave for a week on the Island of Crete (we actually shared the cave with 3 American girls touring Europe on the cheap).  I've been to France, been to the top of the Eiffel Tower, and been to Le Mans.  I was stationed in what was SS headquarters during WWII and have seen the death camps. 

It's funny, isn't it, how things work out.  I knew that Vietnam was my next duty station, but it didn't happen.  I was lucky.  Many others weren't so lucky.  Many others went to Vietnam never to return home.  The "ultimate sacrifice" is more than a catch-all phrase.  It's a reality that has affected mother's and wife's and children and families until this day.

So, for me, Memorial Day has a special significance.  In the sactity of my own mind, I honor those who put country and family and honor and duty and love above all else, even at the risk of their own lives.  God bless them all. 
Until next time.

Denny

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Online basscatlildave

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #7 on: 05/27/18 20:22 UTC »
Thanks for everything.

Offline Paneltruck.lures

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #8 on: 05/28/18 18:21 UTC »
It was the late 60's, Vietnam was in full force, flags were being burned, young bodies were being shipped home daily draped by those same flags , soldiers and sailors and airmen were being spit upon, Free Speech took on a whole new meaning and our nation was split down the middle.  I had a college deferment, but my grades weren't the best so I enlisted in the Army.  During basic training I applied for, and was accepted into, the Officer Candidate School.  Upon completion of basic I was assigned to. Artillery OCS, located at Fort Sill, OK. 

I spent the next six months learning how to lead other young men into battle. (I was 20 years old at the time).  There were no false illusions...we all knew that our next assignment would be in Vietnam.  We kept tabs on body counts and battles.  We all got letters from home informing us of friends who "didn't make it".  We all had an outward false sense of bravado, but inside we were scared "s...less". 

Those six months went by way too fast.  Graduation was upon us and our new duty station would be announced at the ceremony.  It started with awards.  (I got the Outstanding Candidate Award, aka the Biggest Suck-Up Award).  The ceremony ended with the announcement of duty stations.  Of the 80 or so graduates, all but 6 went to Vietnam and I was one of them.  I was assigned to an 8" Self-propelled Howitzer battalion in Nurnberg, West Germany.

I spent the next two years learning how to drink beer and how to eat schnitzel.  I wore a clean uniform every day, had regular mail delivery, drove an Alpha Romero, vacationed in London and Switzerland and Austria.  I got a European discharge and a buddy and I spent over 4 months on motorcycles touring Western Europe.  I lived in a cave for a week on the Island of Crete (we actually shared the cave with 3 American girls touring Europe on the cheap).  I've been to France, been to the top of the Eiffel Tower, and been to Le Mans.  I was stationed in what was SS headquarters during WWII and have seen the death camps. 

It's funny, isn't it, how things work out.  I knew that Vietnam was my next duty station, but it didn't happen.  I was lucky.  Many others weren't so lucky.  Many others went to Vietnam never to return home.  The "ultimate sacrifice" is more than a catch-all phrase.  It's a reality that has affected mother's and wife's and children and families until this day.

So, for me, Memorial Day has a special significance.  In the sactity of my own mind, I honor those who put country and family and honor and duty and love above all else, even at the risk of their own lives.  God bless them all.

Wow so much of that I read about you describing Germany sounded like my dad describing his time around Munich around ‘60-‘61. The always talked about having fun in Austria on the weekends. He said he owned a Mercedes and I was like wow a Mercedes with his response to that was it was the biggest piece of crap he ever owned and owning a 10 year old Mercedes in Germany was nothing exciting. He was in a hurry to get home and buy a Triumph roadster like the ones there in Europe. He told me about one night he and two friends were on guard duty when he noticed one of the other two who had taken up with a local girl who’s family had ties to what was left of the Nazi, had disappeared. They went looking for him and found him hanging upside down unconscious in the window of a arms storage room. Dad called the MP’s who got the guy started on his trip to FT. Leavenworth.

Thank you for your service sounds like a few of guys here on the forum spent time stationed in Oklahoma.
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Offline Do-It Corp.

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #9 on: 05/28/18 19:15 UTC »
Yes, amen to what everyone has said.

Great insight Denny.  Good to hear from you.

Offline Denny Welch

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #10 on: 05/28/18 22:23 UTC »
Hey, Ryan.  It's good to hear from you too.  The forum is still alive and well.  Great bunch of guys.
Until next time.

Denny

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Offline Lamar

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #11 on: 05/29/18 06:08 UTC »
  Thank you Denny for your service. I was on the other side. Graduated and turned 18 in 1977 and at that time they stopped the draft. By the time they started back up again I was to old. I got married and had children. Then my daughter married. Then came the Iraq War and my son in law got called up to serve. I remember standing there with hundreds of other parents holding my pregnant daughter as she trembled and cried uncontrollably watching these young men and women board the bus to go off to war. These people in power that thought this war was so important, I like to know where they were then. I remember when  I was younger hearing of those same stories coming from the Vietnam war era. At times it's truly sad what this country has put young men and women through.

Online ctom

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #12 on: 05/29/18 06:59 UTC »
The Viet Nam war era was a challenging time. The original draft was scary because you had no idea which branch of service you'd go to, so people enlisted to have a choice, like the Army or Navy only to find out the Marines had a recruitment quota to fill and if they fell short they tapped on the Army and Navy's enlistees. Then came the draft by lottery. My number was so high I had little to fear about being drafted but I had several friends that had been draftees ahead of me and who had been killed in action. I had a feeling of revenge and enlisted in the Army even though I knew I had physical limitations, that did in fact, prevent me from doing military service. I do not know to this day if that was a blessing or a crippler. In my junior year of High School I went to three Military funerals for friends who died in Viet Nam. Three more during my senior year so I and a buddy enlisted under the buddy program and went for the enlistment physical over the spring, or Easter, break thinking we'd be able to graduate together then serve together. I'll never forget the sinking feeling when I was pulled out of the physical line and told to dress and wait at the exit for my buddy.

That buddy never went to the war per se. Like Denny, he went to Germany and was trained as a corpsman and assigned to a military hospital which was the first stop for badly soldiers wounded sent there from the war. He returned home addicted to heroin, what he saw as his only escape from the carnage he saw come into his hospital each day.

I experienced quite a bit for not having gone off to war. One thing sticks with me today and that is respect for those who serve and the greatest respect for those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Online WALLEYE WACKER

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #13 on: 05/29/18 08:26 UTC »
It really changes you when you go to Arlington cemetery and see all the rows white stones. When we were in Washington DC they were reading the list of the dead from Vietnam. Went to the cemetery here at home and there are a bunch them here to and paid respects to my moms dad and my dad. Glade to see you back Denny and thank you for your services.

Offline olsarge

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Re: Thank You Veterans and Surviving Families
« Reply #14 on: 05/29/18 17:03 UTC »
Damn, I remember this like it was yesterday.  In 1966 I graduated from high school and enlisted in the Air Force.  A classmate of mine joined the Marines and left for boot camp about a month before I did.  Upon completing basic training  I returned home on leave and was partying with some friends when I learned that Dick had been killed in action.  It really brought the war home for me.  Flas forward 3 decades later and the town I worked in hosted the traveling wall so I naturally went to see it.  I got down to Dick's name and could not believe the loud gasp that escaped my lips.  I found it incredible that after all of these years it still had that much of an impact on me.
I find it incredible that I have to explain to a grown American citizen that taking a knee during the National Anthem is disrespectful.