Author Topic: Pouring Plastics  (Read 389 times)

Offline Rex

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Pouring Plastics
« on: 07/17/18 07:57 UTC »
Hey guys,

Starting to get serious about making my own plastics. I only use them for panfish, mainly in the winter.

Any tips on how to put together a good all around package? My budget to get started is $300.

I would like something more than the starter package that is offered. Any tips on how to make sure I get everything I need?

Online ctom

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Re: Pouring Plastics
« Reply #1 on: 07/17/18 12:46 UTC »
Welcome to the Do-It forums Rex.

The Do-It Ice Tickler and the Wax Wiggler molds are both great ice baits for panfish. The Toothpick molds are a couple others but larger and lack the crazy god action that these two offer. The Wiggler makes 20 of each of two sizes at a pop making it a super versatile mold, with the larger of the two baits good even in open water. Either will take you to good places so I'll suggest getting both.

You'll need an injector and a heat source, to which I suggest hitting Salvation Army store or GoodWill store and grab a cheap microwave. A couple PYREX brand 1 cup measuring cups will be great for the cooking, some plastic [the essential series plastics is super good to beginners!], some colorants [the essential series are way more affordable, some stabilizer and then the digital thermometer offered here in the Do-It store and you should be good to go.

Make sure you read your way thru the  how to stuff found pasted to the top of each category in the plastics area and by all means get back here and ask questions. There is always someone who can help or offer direction.

I will also suggest that for your first order you call it in and ask to speak to Kyle or Ryan as both of these persons are very knowledgeable and can steer you in the right direction before a wrong choice is made.

Spend some time snooping thru the on-line catalog or request a paper one and study it well and make some notes if you need to ask questions. Did I mention the thermometer? When you start with the actual cooking, the biggest issue that smacks people right in the kisser is heat control so whatever you do, DO NOT forget that thermometer.

Again, welcome aboard Rex. You'll enjoy this hobby.

Online Kyle

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Re: Pouring Plastics
« Reply #2 on: 07/17/18 15:05 UTC »
Hey guys,

Starting to get serious about making my own plastics. I only use them for panfish, mainly in the winter.

Any tips on how to put together a good all around package? My budget to get started is $300.

I would like something more than the starter package that is offered. Any tips on how to make sure I get everything I need?

Hey Rex,  Give me a call at 319-984-6055.  I'd be more than happy to help you with your inquiry. 

Online Slow Burn

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Re: Pouring Plastics
« Reply #3 on: 07/17/18 18:34 UTC »
Dont forget gloves clamps and respirator
Find a spot on the South Shoreline

Online Fishermanbt

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Re: Pouring Plastics
« Reply #4 on: 07/17/18 22:09 UTC »
I like that you have a budget cap to get started.  I started with lead jigs and then found myself surrounded by a plethora of soft plastics. As mentioned above research as much as possible and do some prep work on your pouring area at home. Please don’t pour inside your living area like some I’ve seen on YouTube. Dedicate an area where you can make a mess because it will happen wether it be hot or cold plastic spilled, or glitter and so on. It gets messy.

Don’t forget the thermometer in case you missed that in ctom’s post. Gloves are a must. I found that I really like the ones used in gardening due to the non slip rubberized palms. The microwave-you don’t need one that can nuke a frozen turkey in under 5 min. A new one from Walmart runs around $50 and with back to school sales you might find a better deal. Also ck Craig’s List. As for clamps I prefer the pistol grip bar clamps with the rubberized pads. I picked up a 2 pack at Lowe’s a while back for around $20. Some guys prefer c-clamps but that has always made me cringe for some reason.

Get some measuring spoons that have pinch, smid-gen, and dash since most recipes use this format when adding glitter/flake. Speaking of recipes get a notebook to jot down notes on your pours so you can go back later on to pour another batch or tweak it.

What else...I would suggest getting some worm oil during your purchase. A little goes a long way. You can use this to help with bagging baits and to help keep your injector running smoothly. There are a ton of other goodies I can help you spend your money on, but just start out slow and get a feel for it first.

Some highlights to remember:  raw plastic needs to be microwaved in short intervals up to the magical 350 F degrees to avoid scorching. Your microwave power will dictate these times. The cold plastic will go from milk like liquid to a congealed blob then to a syrup like state. Stir between intervals. Most of the neon colors are best added to cold raw plastic then heated where as the darker colors and white can be added at 350. Glitter also gets added after the plastisol has reached 350. Make sure you use enough plastic in your injector to fill the mold to avoid air pockets. Also, you don’t have to lean into the injector when filling a mold. Just enough even pressure to push the plastic through the cavities and trapped air out the vents. If you screw up a pour it’s not the end of the world. Just take a moment to consider what factors played into it.

Hope this helps get you in the right general direction. Ask questions, these guys are a wealth of knowledge.

Offline Rex

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Re: Pouring Plastics
« Reply #5 on: 08/04/18 11:32 UTC »
Life kinda got in the way since last post, had a baby, joined the fire department, remodeling two fish houses and my kid can finally have a summer now that the pins have been taken out of his arm from breaking it the first day of summer.

So far now I’ve been prepping my jig room. I have a window mounted fan above my work station that pulls enough air to move candle flame, would I want to add another fan?

I picked up the Irwin black clamps which seem to be the one recommended most. My tying table is set up, my lead pouring area is set up and my airbrush table and fluid bed table is all set, everything is organized and neat. I put a weather foam slider under the door to help make sure the smell doesn’t get anywhere in the house. We don’t use the basement anyways.

I have purchased Pyrex cups, fire proof gloves, goggles, I have not bought the thermometer, is there any models Tom or others would recommend?

Also another question I have is if I melt down plastic, do I have to use it all in one sitting?

How does a guy clean the cups and injectors? Do you let it get cold and peel the plastic and scrape it out?

I’ll be ordering the wax wiggler and the ice tickler, if the 1 inch nano fry is still in stock, I’ll be ordering that as well.

Does anyone know if the ice pick or the crappie carrot is similar to the little atom wedgee?

Offline andrewlamberson

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Re: Pouring Plastics
« Reply #6 on: 08/04/18 16:17 UTC »
You need a digital thermometer like the one Do-it sells or one like this:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/ThermoPro-Instant-Read-Digital-Electronic-Meat-Cooking-Thermometer-for-Kitchen-Food-Grill-Oven-BBQ-and-Smoker-TP-02S/300890065

Just make sure it measures to 400+ degrees (you need to get your plastic to 350 on the first heat so it completely changes state) reheat doesn't matter ..in fact somtime sometimes it only needs to be 320 to prevent "dents".)

Infrared thermometers are use to measure a solid, not a liquid.

I just let my plastic cool in the cup and peel it out and then give the cup a rub down with a paper towel.

Andy


" You can't buy happiness...But you can buy fishing gear...and that's kind of the same thing"