Author Topic: question  (Read 778 times)

Offline astroglass

  • Yearling
  • **
  • Posts: 40
question
« on: 08/24/18 07:45 UTC »
I make 3 main colors of baits all are transparent in color like punkinseed,watermelon,and smoke and pepper.my baits come out perfect everytime but time they turn a milky color and become oily.i use doit plastic,soft formula,heat additive,i make small batches at a time of 8 oz of plastic,i dont get it to hot,and i let the baits sit out for a couple days before bagging them up.what could i be doing wrong










Online Apdriver

  • Lunker
  • *****
  • Posts: 514
Re: question
« Reply #1 on: 08/24/18 08:24 UTC »
Make sure your initial heat takes it to 350 degrees. Go slow like 1 minute in microwave, stir, then thirty second heats, stir til you get it to 350. Use a thermometer. Go easy on the heat stabilizer. Too much will mess your baits up. It has a yellowish color and will discolor Clear baits and make them tacky when used in excess. In 8 oz. you only need a few drops.

Online ctom

  • Lunker
  • *****
  • Posts: 8246
Re: question
« Reply #2 on: 08/24/18 08:33 UTC »
If you're using the original Crystal Clear formula plastic you haven't been getting it hot enough, to the 350 degrees needed for proper conversion. I went thru this same issue until I started using a digital probe-type thermometer instead if a infrared one. The inconsistently cooked plastic is susceptible to high humidity swings while cause the clouding. The oil is from that which has not been converted fully.

The Crystal Clear plastic is not very forgiving like the Essential plastic is when it comes to getting the plastic fully cooked as it has a narrow window to work within: too cool and you get the foggy baits, too hot and the plastic discolors. Doing the same colors in the Essential you still need the 350 to convert completely but you can get into the 360-365 degree range without stabilizer to assure conversion without burning the plastic. If you want a soft bait, add some softener when mixing the batch. Softener won't affect the flexibility of the higher heat levels.

Offline astroglass

  • Yearling
  • **
  • Posts: 40
Re: question
« Reply #3 on: 08/24/18 21:38 UTC »
should I keep my plastic above 350 degrees or is it ok to let it cool down before shooting.i had a problem with dents in my baits that I was told came from shooting to hot plus ive burned more than my fair share of plastic to.

Online ctom

  • Lunker
  • *****
  • Posts: 8246
Re: question
« Reply #4 on: 08/24/18 22:27 UTC »
You only need to hit the 350 degrees when its first being cooked from the raw state, not hold your plastic at that temp. Absolutely let your  plastic cool a hair to avoid the dents. And on re-heats or re-melts all you need do is heat until it can be stirred, usually around 330 degrees.

On the initial cook to convert the raw plastic I suggest slowing down and do the final heating to the 350 mark in short bursts [try 20 seconds] in the microwave stirring after each shot, but be certain you're using a probe type thermometer to read the plastic's temp after each shot in the microwave. If it comes out of the oven at , say, 340, stir it well and check again as the plastic can continue getting hotter even after its been removed from the microwave.

Offline astroglass

  • Yearling
  • **
  • Posts: 40
Re: question
« Reply #5 on: 08/25/18 09:38 UTC »
thank you

Offline astroglass

  • Yearling
  • **
  • Posts: 40
Re: question
« Reply #6 on: 08/25/18 22:00 UTC »
these baits that I didn't heat properly that have turned milky in color,what if I melt them back down and get the temp up to 350 then re shoot the baits,will they come out right or am I wasting time.

Online ctom

  • Lunker
  • *****
  • Posts: 8246
Re: question
« Reply #7 on: 08/26/18 05:10 UTC »
Its worth trying.

Offline astroglass

  • Yearling
  • **
  • Posts: 40
Re: question
« Reply #8 on: 08/26/18 07:51 UTC »
ill give it a try today and let you know how it turns out

Offline Lines

  • Lunker
  • *****
  • Posts: 1091
Re: question
« Reply #9 on: 08/26/18 08:03 UTC »
In my mind it should work, because it should convert the chemical composition to where it cannot revert back to liqiufied or gel state. If scorched though, the color will darken. Keep us posted. Good luck!

Offline Bass in the hood

  • Kicker
  • ****
  • Posts: 249
    • Bass in the Hood
Re: question
« Reply #10 on: 08/28/18 09:57 UTC »
I think your questions have been answered. But I just wanted to add when I have remelted colors that have become milky they usually stay milky, sometimes I will add a little more color or a hi light to give it a little more sheen. Also I have found that the milky baits, baits that fade or baits that just change colors all still catch bass. I have taken my baits that do not cure properly double or triple the bag count and sell them as a variety pack of recycled worms. They still work and sometime you get unique colors not just a milky or faded version of the original. It also creates less waste, I aways try to recycle  my old plastics as long as they not burnt or something that makes them unusable.
Take Ctom and the others advice and you will you be find. but I would consider using the mistakes you may be pleasantly surprised by there effectiveness.