Author Topic: squash  (Read 104 times)

Online ctom

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squash
« on: 10/10/21 09:31 UTC »
With the garden pretty much cleaned up now we've been eating our winter squash and man are they sweet this year. I plant buttercup variety and got 9 squash off one vine so happy with the single plant's output.

Locally I see wagons and trailers full of squash and pumpkins coming and going fishing. Pricing this year has been better than years past with a $1.00 average for a nice buttercup or butternut or acorn. I like the first two and just don't care for the acorn variety. In spite of the dry summer I am not having any trouble staying fixed for squash. When our last two are gone I'll be buying maybe $20.00 worth for late fall and early winter dining.

I've been waiting for the frost to knock my carrot tops down before digging but these last couple weeks of upper 70's/lower 80's with nights in the mid-60's hasn't helped much. And I am waiting for colder weather to get my garlic planted. At this rate it'll be about Christmas time to plant it. The heat is really screwing up the fall crappie fishing too.

Am I the only squash lover here?

Offline Lamar

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Re: squash
« Reply #1 on: 10/11/21 06:47 UTC »
  I love squash. I have a buddy that always plants to much so I rob some off of him every year. I like the butternut the best. I peal them and then cut them in into cubes and roast them. It's just good fall food.

Offline bassinfool

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Re: squash
« Reply #2 on: 10/11/21 13:51 UTC »
Had some pattypan squash and zucchini growing well and then our garden got totally swamped with a deluge of rain and it decimated my vines.  Tomato worms made quick work of my tomato plants as well but I have more okra than I know what to do with.  I still have poblano, anaheim and thai chilis that are growing well in addition to my herb garden that has Greek, Italian and Mexican oregano, basil, thyme, mint and some lemon verbena that never really took off. 

My parents have some wild blueberry bushes around their house and gave me a little shy of four pounds they had taking up room in their freezer that I thawed, added some blueberry juice to and pureed down to make a blueberry Berliner Weisse (German sour beer).  I'll attach a picture as I am pretty proud of how this one turned out.  Tom, I know you dabble in wine making and grow a couple hop varietals have you ever tried your hand at making beer?  Given your penchant for do-it yourself things I am sure you would be a natural.

Online ctom

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Re: squash
« Reply #3 on: 10/11/21 15:39 UTC »
Tom, I know you dabble in wine making and grow a couple hop varietals have you ever tried your hand at making beer?  Given your penchant for do-it yourself things I am sure you would be a natural.

Ha! Here we go. lol

Years ago a buddy and I made several types of beer. One was a stout that required cool fermenting and he had a dirt cellar that never varied more than four degrees of 55 degrees, winter or summer or in between. That black beer we made averaged about 16% alcohol. We had about 40 cases of the stuff stacked down there at the end of each summer and would put a six pack apiece in the fridge for when we watched football on Sundays. Eventually we narrowed it down to four bottles apiece so we could remember the games' final scores. We made that stuff for maybe ten years then sort of fell away from the beer making.

Your blueberry beer looks very nice. Dang, I think I can smell it. Schells Brewing here in southern Minnesota makes a blueberry beer that is seasonal and is a featured beer at our State Fair. There's a micro-brewery in Ely, Minnesota right up in the headwaters of the boundary Boundary Waters that features a seasonal blueberry beery. Had them both. Shiner and Castle Danger Brewing both have seasonal raspberry wheat beers that are exceptional for fruited beers too.

Here in SE Minnesota within an hour's drive of home I can think of maybe 60 microbreweries and that many wineries along with eight or 10 craft distilleries. I'm really content with letting all of these places deal with the messes and headaches so I can drive Ma to them and we can enjoy something other than common store brands. Actually Hamms is a locally decent good beer that sells for about 11 bucks a 30 pack in Wisconsin and I get to the river near Wisconsin where I can grab a 30 in a gas station before coming home. I have Shiner Bock and Castle Danger Cream Ale in the fridge all the time too. The Shiner is a Texas beer and the cream ale is from Two Harbors, MN where the cabin is located....really like both in addition to the Hamms. Wisconsin's New Glarus Brewing, in said city, has the Spotted Cow brew that is a really popular beer with in both states but I can take it or leave it. Duluth Minnesota has five or six micro-breweries and here in Rochester we have six, one only a few block from home.

I do make wine every couple years but currently seem to have plenty yet from the last couple years. Carole and her clan are the wine drinkers but they can pack away the beer too. I also enjoy a good bourbon straight up, no ice. Knob Creek small batch, 4 Roses Small Batch, and Makers Mark Select are about my favorites...a couple fingers in a snifter just to sip while I am working in the shop. Maybe once every couple weeks. I don't do shots or more than the couple fingers. Bourbon is for me to enjoy.