Author Topic: Something a Bit Different!  (Read 2404 times)

Offline efishnc

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Re: Something a Bit Different!
« Reply #30 on: 02/03/21 22:20 UTC »
My dad and brother each caught one on separate occasions when I was a kid... clamped iron jaws and a whole lot of commotion (which certainly made it difficult to remove the hook), but I don't remember them as tackle busters or boat wreckers, just impossible to hold.

Offline bigjim5589

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Re: Something a Bit Different!
« Reply #31 on: 02/08/21 21:41 UTC »
I used to catch some large eels when I was a kid in MD. I fished a small tidal creek near home, and would occasionally hook some that were in the 3' to 3 1/2' length range. I wouldn't call them tackle busters either, but they  can pull hard, and were very slimy and hard to hold on to and often swallowed the hook. I carried an old bath towel with me just for those Eels. When I got one in, I would pin down it's head with my foot, while holding the line tight, and cut the line near it's mouth. Then later retrieve the hook when I cleaned them.

I didn't mind catching them that big either, as I was usually fishing for Bullheads and a big eel was very tasty and not difficult to clean. There's only one bone and the meat is white & flaky. My mother would have me cut them into pieces about 5" long and she would batter & fry them.

American Eels in MD used to be good business too. Many of the waterman around the Chesapeake Bay caught them and used them for baiting crab pots, sold as crab baits for hand lining crabs, and the smaller ones were sold live as baits for Striper anglers. Stripers love eels! As I understand it, they were also a delicacy in Japan and other Asian countries and the demand caused a huge depletion of their numbers. I haven't heard of any big one's caught in a long time and it had been a lot of years since I had caught a big one when I still lived there.

Stripers love eels so much that I often used ribbontail worms when fishing for them.  ;D
« Last Edit: 02/09/21 15:40 UTC by bigjim5589 »

Offline efishnc

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Re: Something a Bit Different!
« Reply #32 on: 02/09/21 09:42 UTC »
I never would have guessed eels to be white and flaky...

I'm pretty sure the two eels that we boated were smoked (like most non-game fish dad kept) as were many of the unfortunate dogfish that crossed the gunwales.

Offline bigjim5589

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Re: Something a Bit Different!
« Reply #33 on: 02/09/21 15:44 UTC »
I've heard that folks eat those dogfish, but have never had the pleasure of trying them.

Smoked eel is also something I've eaten, but wasn't how we prepared them. My father liked various smoked fish, and sometimes bought them, and I acquired many of his tastes for such things, although it has been a lot of years since I've had any smoked fish at all.  :D

Offline bassinfool

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Re: Something a Bit Different!
« Reply #34 on: 02/09/21 15:47 UTC »
American Eels in MD used to be good business too. Many of the waterman around the Chesapeake Bay caught them and used them for baiting crab pots, sold as crab baits for hand lining crabs, and the smaller ones were sold live as baits for Striper anglers. Stripers love eels! As I understand it, they were also a delicacy in Japan and other Asian countries and the demand caused a huge depletion of their numbers.

Jellied eels was a staple in many parts of the UK for a long time but, like many things, has fallen to the wayside in the last few decades.