Author Topic: Foiling baits  (Read 185 times)

Online ctom

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Foiling baits
« on: 01/13/21 14:07 UTC »
Last fall I started taking an interest in foiling some of my small crankbaits and more recently did the foiling on a couple Flutter Spoons and I really like the outcome on the lead. Originally I ordered a bunch of the foiling supplies from a Chinese source. The service was quick, like four days to the door step.  And the actual process took about one minute to foil a bait. When I made the first order I got four of the "kits" and had a fair amount of the foil and adhesive but with plans I have for doing more I have been looking at getting more supplies. Today Carole and I took a drive to another town west of here for a sewing machine service job so while we waited on the machine we stopped in a JoAnn's Fabrics. She hit the fabrics, I hit the crafting stuff.

While digging around I came up with a possible foil product but determined it would be too thick for what I want to do so I went down a different aisle and was getting discouraged when I looked down and saw a flat package that said "heat setting foil". I said "AHA"! Sure enough, its what I need so I grabbed a pack each of silver and gold and a tube of adhesive. The adhesive is easier to work with than the heat and the foil works either way. Carole gave  me a 40% off coupon good for one item. I figured about $24.00 before the coupon and when the till quit rattling I owed $9.01. I paid and was looking at the charge slip in the car waiting on Carole and discovered the foils were 60% off each. Needless to say, I'm one happy camper.

On the Flutter Spoons I favor three color patterns: silver with a blue stripe, gold with a purple stripe and gold with an orange stripe. I add eyes then I add the color stripes using a soft brush and transparent air brush colors using successive coats until I have to coverage I want, then seal twice using CS Seal Coat. Easy and functional. All of these done in the 1/4 ounce size. I use a short shanked, wide gapped, treble hook with these and tip a barb with a minnow head. A simple 12" to 18" lift, drop on a tight line, rest for ten seconds then repeat. The hits are solid hits, none of the grab the minnow head and suck numbers. Whack and game on.

Dedicated perch anglers can use a short [1" to 1 1/2"] bead chain dropper ending with a single aberdeen hook off the bottom hook loop tipped with the minnow head if they'd rather use meat instead of bugs.

When I get some much needed supplies on Friday so I can cast again I'll get some of these in a picture and posted here. Until then, ya'll should think about this foiling process for both lead and hard crankbait bodies and those who fish thru the ice should give some serious thought to the Flutter Spoon mold. I sure does a dandy bait.



These three colors have been my mainstays and a couple already show some battle scars. I cast another 50 today and plan to start foiling tonight or tomorrow.

Offline Partycrasher

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Re: Foiling baits
« Reply #1 on: 01/13/21 16:54 UTC »
Sounds cool, Tom.  Anxious to see them.

I've been playing with nail transfer foil on Flutter jigs.  You lay down an adhesive on the Flutter Jig and while its tacky you lay down the transfer foil.  When the time is right, you peel off the plastic and the foil transfers to the bait.  You can top coat at that point.  Also an interesting look that you cant get with regular paint.

Marc

Online ctom

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Re: Foiling baits
« Reply #2 on: 01/13/21 18:26 UTC »
That's the product I'm using Marc. Move over Rapala.....lol.... you no longer are the king of flash. I love it.

Offline Partycrasher

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Re: Foiling baits
« Reply #3 on: 01/14/21 10:04 UTC »
Back in the lake Michigan Salmon hay-days (late 70's early 80's) I was making my own wooden J-Plugs.  I used actual kitchen tin foil on them...lol.  After the bait was shaped and sealed, I would coat the bait with a thin layer of epoxy and then wrap it in tin foil with the seam ending up on the back so I could paint the back and hide it.  But while the epoxy was soft... I'd roll the knurled handle of a screw driver I had over the foil to leave a scale imprint in the foil that would set in the epoxy.  I little paint and a top coat and I had a J-Plug with the silver scale like a traditional silver Rapala finish.  They worked and held up well.

Later on,  I found a super thin metallic film that was used by R/C airplane builders that worked well and I could get gold as well as silver.  A stroll through a good hobby shop always spawned some interesting ideas. 

Marc

Offline 21xdc

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« Last Edit: 01/14/21 14:25 UTC by 21xdc »