Author Topic: Shiny Sinkers  (Read 347 times)

Offline David_C

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Shiny Sinkers
« on: 05/09/19 05:59 UTC »
Hi guys
I'm new to this forum and from South Australia  :)

About a year ago, I bought a stack of do-it moulds from a tackle shop that was closing down. Since then I've bought a few more moulds from Do-it (down rigger bombs) and have managed to sell a few of them, which is awesome. I mainly use roofing lead, as it's fairly clean, without much crap - and melts quickly.

In speaking to some of the tackleshop owners, they are happy with the sinkers I make but want them shiny - as their customers want them that way. I tend to agree, as mine seem to dull quickly.

So my question is - what do you guys use to mix with the lead to make it shiny? Also, what quantities do you mix it with? My pot holds approximately 35 kilos of lead - which is huge - but does the job.

Much appreciated.

David

Offline efishnc

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Re: Shiny Sinkers
« Reply #1 on: 05/09/19 06:16 UTC »
Welcome David -

Dull lead is oxidized lead (and purer lead seems to oxidize more/faster)… I also use roofing lead, but seldom worry about finish (unless I’m painting them, which I do right away).
You might try adding some tin to create a brighter alloy, but I would only be guessing as to proportions (partycrasher might be better to advise here)…or you could coat your sinkers to prevent them from oxidizing with spray or brush-on lacquer (or maybe a light oil or something else to seal the air out).

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Offline Bucho

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Re: Shiny Sinkers
« Reply #2 on: 05/09/19 08:06 UTC »
Tin will brighten it up a bit but is not really shiny unless 100% pure which again is way out of budget and too light in weight for a downrigger ball.

I assume the only lasting way to get them to shine is to electrolyse them with chrome. No idea how to do it exactly and if it is worth the trouble. I once saw a jig crafter making chrome jig heads somewhere in latin america where labour is cheaper than decent powderpain. It might be economical on a high end downriggerball like those shark products.

https://fatnancystackle.com/products/shark-cannonballs-faceted-black-shark-1

Another alternative might be a thin layer of clear powder paint on very fresh castings that haven`t oxidised yet. I did that when I started out on my very first jig head castings and didn`t like it, but it is better than all dull any day.   
« Last Edit: 05/09/19 08:08 UTC by Bucho »

Offline Apdriver

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Re: Shiny Sinkers
« Reply #3 on: 05/09/19 08:23 UTC »
I would just topcoat my fresh pours to keep them shiny. Over time, lead will oxidize and the shiny stuff you see in stores is freshly poured product. I like the look of the dipped seal coat heads. It’s water based so should be easy enough to work with and keep your lead looking fresh.

https://store.do-itmolds.com/Seal-Coat-_p_807.html

Online WALLEYE WACKER

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Shiny Sinkers
« Reply #4 on: 05/09/19 09:33 UTC »
Welcome David what size down rigger balls are you selling? And you can spray them with with KBS Diamond Clear but over time and wear they will turn dark but at least they were shinny at the shop.

https://www.kbs-coatings.com/DiamondFinish-Clear-Aerosol.html
« Last Edit: 05/09/19 09:36 UTC by WALLEYE WACKER »

Offline David_C

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Re: Shiny Sinkers
« Reply #5 on: 05/21/19 07:37 UTC »
Thanks guys

I sell mainly the 8lb and 10lb bombs, which we use for kingfish, salmon, snapper and snook. But I have found that a lot of down riggers here in Australia, seem to now be the smaller models, that can't handle that weight. So I've just had made a 4lb bomb, in the same style as the Do-It ones - I was hoping to get one off the shelf but there wasn't one that was exactly what I wanted.
Only just got it last night, so will start pouring them over this weekend, ready for sale :)
David